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  • Writer's pictureDavid Sage

Considering an Inverse Condemnation Action

Updated: Mar 27, 2023


Public records data can provide valuable information about property ownership, values, and characteristics, which can help attorneys identify potential class members for an Inverse Condemnation lawsuit.


Public records data can provide valuable information about property ownership, values, and characteristics, which can help attorneys identify potential class members for an inverse condemnation lawsuit. Public records data can also provide insight into the government's actions, such as land use regulations and permits, that may have led to the alleged inverse condemnation.





Identifying Potential Class Members


The first step in identifying potential class members for an inverse condemnation lawsuit is to obtain public records data from local government agencies or third-party purveyors. This data can include property ownership records, tax assessments, land use permits, and zoning regulations. Attorneys can use this data to identify properties that have been impacted by the government's actions, such as through zoning changes or regulations.


Once we have helped you identify potential properties, you can use the public records data to further analyze the properties and determine whether they meet the criteria for inclusion in the class. This may include analyzing the value of the property before and after the government's actions, as well as the impact of the government's actions on the property's use and enjoyment.


BCM Analytics will help you obtain, filter, and analyze the public records information that will be most relevant to your efforts. We have experience with inverse condemnation due to flooding, and with data mining of public records information to identify class members.


Challenges and Considerations


Using public records data to identify potential class members for an inverse condemnation lawsuit is not without its challenges. For example, the data may not be up to date or accurate, which can lead to incorrect identifications of potential class members. In addition, some property owners may be difficult to locate or may not want to participate in the lawsuit, which can make it challenging to build a strong case.


Public records data can be a valuable tool for identifying potential class members for an inverse condemnation lawsuit. By analyzing property ownership records, tax assessments, land use permits, and zoning regulations, attorneys can identify properties that have been impacted by the government's actions and determine whether they meet the criteria for inclusion in the class. While there are challenges and considerations when using public records data, it can be an effective way to build a strong case for inverse condemnation and seek compensation for property owners who have been affected by the government's actions.


Anyone considering an inverse condemnation action arising out of flooding damage should consider using BCM Analytics as a resource to help identify potential members in a class action suit.


 

Inverse condemnation occurs when the government takes private property without compensation, or when regulations or actions by the government effectively deprive property owners of the use and enjoyment of their property. Inverse condemnation lawsuits can be complex and require the identification of a class of plaintiffs who have been similarly affected by the government's actions. One way to identify potential class members is through public records data.

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